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Key Guest Lecturers

Carlos Saura

School: National Academy for Theatre and Film Arts (NATFA)
Field of Teaching: Film Directing, Screenwriting
Website Reference: http://www.clubcultura.com/clubcine/clubcineastas/saura/
Major Achievements: In 1957-1958, Saura created his first film (Cuenca). In 1962 his film Los Golfos was recognized for its strong sociological impact in the betterment of the Spanish youth by tackling juvenile delinquency in Madrid's poorest districts. Four years later (1966), he was honored at the 16th Berlin International Film Festival, where he received the Silver Bear for Best Director for his film La caza. In 1967, his film Peppermint Frappé also received the Silver Bear for Best Director at the 18th Berlin International Film Festival. He won the Golden Bear in 1981 at the 31st Berlin International Film Festival for his film Deprisa, Deprisa.
The films La prima Angélica (Cousin Angélica) of 1973 and Cría cuervos (Raising Ravens [from the Spanish phrase: Cria cuervos y te sacaran los ojos (Raise ravens and they will peck out your eyes)]) of 1975 received the special prize of the jury at the Cannes Film Festival. His film Mama cumple 100 años (Mom is celebrating her 100 years) was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film at the 52nd Academy Awards.
Saura has become known for making movies featuring traditional flamenco and other Spanish dances. His Flamenco Trilogy of the 1980s includes Bodas de Sangre (Blood Wedding), Carmen, and El amor brujo featuring the work of Spanish flamenco dancer Cristina Hoyos. He later made the movies Flamenco (1995), Tango (1998), and Fados (2007).
His 1989 film La noche oscura was entered into the 39th Berlin International Film Festival.
Saura considers his film Buñuel and the table of King Solomon -2001to be his best cinematic work “That’s the greatest film I’ve ever made. I like the film but nobody else seems to like it. I’m sure Buñuel would have loved this film. But perhaps only he would have loved it. Everything you see in the film is actually based on conversations I had with him.”
In 1990, he received the Goya Award for the best director and best script for Ay, Carmela! He was chosen as director for the official film of t




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